Ginnifer Goodwin Online : Your Online Resource for Ginnifer Goodwin
18
Feb 16
Ali Articles & Interviews, Family & Relationships, Zootopia Comments Off on Ginnifer Goodwin Admits She’s Not Ready to Have Another Boy

Ginnifer Goodwin joked with ET that she sometimes forgets she’s has a baby bump — but not when she’s wearing stilettos!

“It’s just being pregnant in heels is like a whole thing!” the 37-year-old actress quipped while at the Hollywood premiere of Zootopia on Wednesday night. “Like, center of gravity is very, very different!”

Goodwin arrived on the red carpet with her husband and Once Upon a Time co-star, Josh Dallas, and admitted that she’s not quite ready for her second child. The couple welcomed their son, Oliver Finlay Dallas, in May 2014.

“It’s terrible! We keep forgetting that we’re pregnant — my husband and I both,” she said. “I’ll lean up against something and I’m like, ‘Oh there’s a belly there!'”

Goodwin also revealed that she’s expecting a boy, but has yet to decide on a name. “We’re trying on different things. It’s hard because we are having a boy and we blew it,” she joked. “I mean, not blew it, but Oliver to us is like the best name on the planet. So, how do we follow Oliver with another name that’s just as stunning?”

In Zootopia, Goodwin is the voice of heroine, Judy Hopps, but admits that her son, Oliver isn’t quite at the age to understand that his mother is portraying the animated character. “I don’t think he’s old enough to connect the dots. But he was given a handful of Zootopia toys by our filmmakers, and he really is attached to them in this kind of strange, foreshadowing way,” she shared. “I mean, he doesn’t understand, even though we’ve said mommy plays this character.”

Goodwin is hoping kids that do see the movie are empowered by Judy Hopps as much as she was when portraying the character. “I think I am as optimistic and idealistic as Judy Hobbes. I chose a career where …everything is against an actress going into this business and I’m not crazy skinny and I don’t look like a lot of actresses,” she explained. “My path could have gone a very different way. I’ve been extremely lucky!”

Zootopia hits theaters March 4.


17
Feb 16
Ali Articles & Interviews, Family & Relationships Comments Off on Ginnifer Goodwin Hopes Her Sons Embrace Her Love of All Things Disney

People.com shares how Ginny has shared that she hopes to instill in Oliver her love of Disney.

Ginnifer Goodwin loves getting lost in a good fairy tale and including her family in the fun.

The actress’ occupation as a Disney princess on TV’s Once Upon a Time has added a few storybook-like elements to her life: the introduction to her husband and costar Josh Dallas and enhanced the actress’ overall appreciation for the Mouse House (Once Upon a Time is produced by ABC, a Disney company), which she says has also rubbed off on her 21-month-old son Oliver.

“We’ve gone to [Disneyland] probably a bit more than is healthy,” Goodwin, 37, reveals in the spring issue of Disney twenty-three.

“Oliver loves, loves, loves it. I have a video of him having a dance jam with Pluto and Donald. He cries when we take him away from the characters instead of what most toddlers do, which is cry when the characters come to them.”

Goodwin, who is pregnant with the couple’s second son, says motherhood has brought out a newfound appreciation for the lessons and cautionary tales within most Disney stories.

“I have a couple deep, dark fears about childrearing, like they won’t love Disneyland because I’ll oversaturate them,” she says.

“I also fear that they will say things to me like, ‘Mom, I don’t know why you think you sound like that bunny. You’re not Judy.’ ” (Goodwin lends her voice as Judy in the upcoming animated film Zootopia.)

The spring issue of Disney twenty-three is published by the official Disney fan club D23 and will be available to D23 Gold Members.


12
Feb 16
Ali Zootopia Comments Off on Film Review: Disney’s ‘Zootopia’

Variety gives us our first review of Zootopia.

Disney offers a decades-later correction to ‘Song of the South,’ in which rabbits and foxes have a chance to live together in relative harmony.

From the company that brought you the utopian simplicity of “It’s a Small World” comes a place where mammals of all shapes, sizes and dietary preferences not only live in harmony, but also are encouraged to be whatever they want — a revisionist animal kingdom in which lions and lambs lay down the mayoral law together, and a cuddly-wuddly bunny can grow up to become the city’s top cop. Welcome to “Zootopia,” where differences of race and species serve no obstacle to either acceptance or achievement. It is, in short, a city that only the Mouse House could imagine, and one that lends itself surprisingly well to a classic L.A.-style detective story, a la “The Big Lebowski” or “Inherent Vice,” yielding an adult-friendly whodunit with a chipper “you can do it!” message for the cubs.

Opening in several European countries weeks ahead of its March 4 domestic release, “Zootopia” is full of motormouthed characters and American culture in-jokes — no surprise, considering it was directed by Byron Howard, whose girl-power “Tangled” kicked off the recent Disney revival, and “The Simpsons” vet Rich Moore, who co-helmed “Wreck-It Ralph.” But that should pose little obstacle to its worldwide appeal, boosted by some of the most huggable Disney characters since “Lilo & Stitch.”

While her 225 bunny brothers and sisters are content to stay on the farm, aspirational rabbit Judy Hopps (Ginnifer Goodwin) shows an early aptitude for conflict management, stepping in when a schoolyard bully hassles her classmates. Not so surprisingly, the offender happens to be a fox, though Judy doesn’t give in to such species typing, insisting that jerks come in all shapes and sizes. So, too, do heroes, and despite the limitations of her tiny scale, Judy enlists in the Zootopia police academy, struggling at first before outwitting her larger rivals.

Graduating at the top of her class, Judy packs her bags for a job in the big city — which is like a cross between one of those shiny 21st-century Dubai complexes featuring indoor skiing and surfing, and a new Disney theme-park adjunct, complete with climate-specific subdivisions like Tundratown and Sahara Square. “There’s far too much to take in here,” as the opening scene of “The Lion King” promises (a movie whose stunning African savannah was downright simplistic compared with the world “Zootopia” has to establish), and Howard and Moore struggle to make their introduction anywhere near as impressive, despite leaning heavily on an unremarkable “I want” song called “Try Everything,” performed by Gazelle (Shakira), the veld’s sveltest pop idol (well-meaning sample lyric: “I wanna try even though I could fail”).

Doing justice to an elaborate new environment poses a familiar problem, slightly improved from last year’s “Tomorrowland,” in the sense that Judy (who probably should have grown up in town, like everyone else in Zootopia) takes a long train ride into the city, ogling the various districts as she passes. It’s a sequence worth studying a dozen times down the road just to catch all the tiny details, from the hippo-drying stations to the plastic hamster tubes, although it’s an awkward way to acquaint ourselves with the city.

In theory, Zootopia’s residents have evolved past distinctions of predator and prey, which might explain the small matter of cartoon biology: Whether tiny mice or hulking rhinoceroses, all animals have front-facing eyes, upright postures and opposable thumbs — a throwback to the delightful character design featured in Disney’s “Robin Hood” (1973), which reimagined a human world populated entirely by animals, integrating characteristics of each species into the ways different creatures move.

In progressive-minded Zootopia, a moose can co-anchor the evening news with a snow leopard without it turning into an episode of “When Animals Attack!” That said, even the most basic social interactions remain tense, as the city’s caste system matches animals to the roles that suit them best (the DMV is all-too-accurately staffed by slow-moving sloths, for example), while still adhering closely to the hierarchy of the food chain (with a few amusing exceptions, including a cameo by “Pinky and the Brain” actor Maurice LaMarche as a Don Corleone-like arctic shrew).

Continue Reading


12
Feb 16
Ali Images, Zootopia Comments Off on Zootopia Images

I have added a bunch of new images from Ginny’s film Zootopia that hits theaters March 4th.


Gallery Links:

Ginnifer Goodwin Online > FILMS > 2016 | Zootopia


31
Dec 15
Ali Video, Zootopia Comments Off on New Zootopia Trailer


06
Dec 15
Ali Images, Once Upon A Time Comments Off on Once Upon a Time | Swan Song Stills

New stills from tonight’s all new episode of Once Upon a Time, Swan Song.


Gallery Links:

Ginnifer Goodwin Online > Once Upon A Time > Season Five > Episode Stills > 05×11 | Swan Song


06
Dec 15
Ali Images, Once Upon A Time Comments Off on Once Upon A Time Capture Catch Up

More caps have been added to the gallery from the last few episodes of Once Upon a Time.


Gallery Links:

Ginnifer Goodwin Online > Once Upon A Time > Season Five > Episode Captures


05
Dec 15
Ali Once Upon A Time, Video Comments Off on Next on Once Upon a Time | Swan Song

Tomorrow is the Winter Finale of Once Upon a Time:




By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close